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The Library Tab! De Luxe 

ING OVEB ONE HUNDRED 
RA CATCHES FLASHED 
HE BIG CUT F-DOORS OF 

CAUI RJNlA 

ring the Transition of the Desert 
m a Pietin luiiCrary 

/row 

S uaw '■ ■ Lady 
n -sack to Ermine 

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se> ! to y scrap er 



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i. \N iREGORY 

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j£, CALIFORNIA 






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of the Sui •* issued 
quart) \y. Price, 50 ct&» pex cop> 

all pa dug aw annual sub- 

scription, a spc- ai prl: of $LGQ and 
p. %ge extra v? be made, entiding the 

additional numbers at 

!» of $ I. -00 for four magazines, the 

regular price io non- bacribers being 

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THE CRUISER SAN DIEGO 
One of Uncle Sam's efficient guardians of the Western Coast 



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THE PLYMOUTH ROCK OF THE PACIFIC 

Here the Cross was Planted by Father Serra 

in the Year 1760. 






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Then grow as God hath planted, grow 
A lordly oak or daisy low. 
As he hath set his garden; be 
Just what thou art, or grass or tree. 

— Joaquin Miller. 



The 

Yesterday 

and Today 

of 

San 

Diego 







THE PALM COURT AND FOUNTAIN IN 
FRONT OF THE PALATIAL U. S. GRANT 
HOTEL, SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 










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Well at Japanese 

Tea Garden, Coronad 





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Arch of the Wishing Well 



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Ramona's Marriage Place 

Old Town — San Diego, California 

"There's a certain charm about it, 

With its flowers and its bees, 
That seems to rest your spirit 

And set your heart at ease. 
It brings back fond old memories 

That time can not quite efface, 
And you feel that God is smiling 

On Ramona's Marriage Place." 

Twenty minutes' ride from the business 
heart of the thriving, bustling city of San 
Diego, reached by the car line marked "Ra- 
mona's Home," lies the sleepy little hamlet 
known as "Old Town." From the window 
of a railroad coach, or whirling by in an au- 
tomobile, "Old Town" would hardly be 
given a passing glance, yet, this very "Old 
Town" was the beginning of all California, 
for here the brown-robed Franciscan, Juni- 
pero Serra planted the Cross in 1769 and 

jtablished the first of the chain of 21 Missions that dot El Camino Real, 

The King's Highway," from San Diego to Sonoma. Here General Fremont 

t 1 846, first planted the United States flag on 

Duthern California soil. Here is the old 

lurch with its first Mission bells, brought 

om Spain. The first palm trees; the old 

raveyard with its crumbling walls and faded 

eadboards; the first brick house in Calif or- 

ia; the Church of the Immaculate Concep- 

on started in 1 869 by Father Ubach (Father 

iaspara in the novel Ramona) and which was 

ot completed until 1914; the first jail, the 

erra Cross built of old tile, and the "Mar- 
age Place of Ramona", can all be seen in a 

alf hour's stroll. 
Yet all this would be forgotten and un- 

oticed and "Old Town" would know naught 

f the many visitors that come to California, 

rere it not for the fact that away back in 

854, that charming and gifted woman, Mrs. 

lelen Hunt Jackson, gathered in Southern 

California the material around which she wove 

Ramona," a story so beautiful, so throbbing 

rith love, life and sympathy, that it thrilled 

he reading world. She said that her heroine 

/as married to Alessandro, her Indian sweet- 

leart, in the low adobe building just across 

rom the Plaza in Old Town, San Diego. So, 

or ever so many years, the old Estudillo house, 

/hich covers nearly a city block, has been 

:nown as the "Marriage Place of Ramona." 

acing the "Old Town" Plaza, where the 

Jnited States flag was first planted in South- 

rn California, the front of Ramona's Mar- 

iage Place occupies the entire block, each 

zing being nearly 75 feet long. The house 

; built of adobe (which is mud, cactus juice 

nd straw, fashioned into large brick, baked oid-time Flowers 







4 





























d the generosity and the hospitality of the Estudillos made them loved by 
I. Three generations of them occupied the old home, the last one being 
ilvador, son of Jose Antonio, who, on moving to Los Angeles in 1 887, left 
in charge of a keeper, who betrayed the trust placed in him by Salvador 
fter Ramona was written and the Estudillo house was given as the house 
Father Gaspara), selling to the visiting strangers anything they demanded 
; a souvenir of the old house, even to the huge brass door keys, tile 'rom 
ie roof or floor, wrought-iron fixtures and candlesticks and chips and splin- 
rs from the hand-hewn woodwork, until the once beautiful place became 
te pitiful ruin so often pictured. 

But the tender tradition of Ramona's marriage, which had taken place 
iithin this house, never departed from it. Every passerby recalled it to 
lind, and it was always called to the attention of the visitor and stranger. 

It was restored in 1910 by Mr. John D. Spreckels, and it is, aside from 
ie romance connected with it, one of the most beautiful and interesting 

The old, old place, before Mr. John D. Spreckels restored the ruins and, • .1 „ ij A c Mrc TarL-snn tn\A thr srnrv Ramnna rr»p rtanahrer 

it one of the historical exhibits of the coast laces in the world. As Mrs. jacKson tola tne story, ixamona, tne aaugnter 

: a Scotch sailor, a trader among the Indians, and an Indian mother and 
in the sun) the walls being from two to four feet thick, and roofed winter daughter to a wealthy Spanish family, had eloped and wandered with 
resting on huge timbers, brought from the Cuyamaca mountains— brc lessandro, all the way from Camulos Ranch to San Diego, to be married by 
on the shoulders of the Mission Indians, who worked in relays and tather Gaspara, whom Alessandro said was a friend of the Indians. Dear 
carried fifty-foot timbers a distance of forty miles in two days. The bid Father Salvadero was then at Santa Barbara, or dead, as Alessandro 
are bound together with rawhide thongs, no nails being used. Acrosiight secretly have thought. He had not been heard from in a long time, 
beams are laid the shoots of Caresa (a tule grass from the neighboring anyway, Alessandro preferred to journey to San Diego. He believed he 
and upon this is laid the Mission curved tile, which formed gutters to ould more successfully elude pursuit in that direction, for it is to be remem- 
the roof in the rainy season. ered, he had eloped with Ramona, and they both knew what a terrible 

The building surrounds a patio or courtyard about 75 by 1 50 feetiing the wrath of Senora Morena would be when the knowledge of their 
southern end of which is sheltered by beautiful yellow acacia, olive ct reached her. 

pepper trees. In the center is the fountain and all colors of lilies bloo: Perhaps the most delightful and fascinating part of this story is the 
the basin, into which the water falls in a ' eathery spray. scital of the prenuptial journey 

The old garden is a riot of color, flowering shrubbery, climbing vf the lovers down that golden 
roses and a host of old-fashioned flowers are always blooming summttretch of country that lies be- 
winter between the sanded walks. Scattered about are orange, lemor.ween Camulos and San Diego s 
quat, figs, mulberry, guava, zapate and Calatina cherry trees, which all tlarbor of the Sun in the Califor- 
som and fruit in season. In the building are twelve large rooms (w.ia of the South. The story of 
open into the Patio) and the family Chapel, for the Estudillos were ne days in the wonderful Canyon 
devotees of the faith. After 1 834 when Mexico secularized the Miss J the Ferns which Alessandro had 
many of the treasures from the San Diego Mission were brought here, ^covered, and where sweet Ra- 
of the Mission bells being on wooden beams in the Patio, and the Estiva wished they might live for- 
Chapel became the only public place of worship in San Diego for many yy er » is found on tnat journey, and 

Built originally in 1825 by Don Jose Estudillo, a pure Castilian wl^ny others like it. 
family became prominent in California Mission history, it became the The ruins of Pala and the glories 

vorite gathering place for the culture and refinement of Southern Califaf San Luis Re y Mission, now re- 
ared, are a'so on that road, and 

ie golden hills that watch above 

ie sunset sea are there as well. 

o it was in Old Town that Ra- 

lona was married and the old Es- 

jdillo Patio teems with the same 

>mance today. At the end of a 

owered pergola stands the 

Wishing Well," over which on 

[i old weather-beaten board is the 

)llowing inscription: 

Quaff ye the waters of Ramona's 
Well; 

tood luck they bring and secrets 
tell; 

lessed were they by sandaled 
Friar ; 











d drink and wish for thy desire." R 



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Part of Wishing Well 

are hung with old family 
thoughts: 



Here one can see the old Spanish oven, ty, 

ican carreta, first stage coach in California, 

"Cactus Patch" and the Crystal bowl. I 

The house is filled with quaint old reliql 

the past, including the furniture from the J 

room of the late Father I Iorton (founderl 

San Diego), the wonderful Black MadoJ 

from Monserrate, shrine from the old Missy 

of San Miguel, Pasquel Perez, painting of $« 

Francis of Assis, first Mission chair, Mrs. Hd 

Hunt Jackson's chair, and hundreds of cur,: 

of old California. In the lecture room, thro 

a Mission arch, one looks upon a cycloraJ 

painting of California, showing the old MissicJ 

and the geographical points covered in the stel 

of "Ramona." Here one sees the full glare! 

day, the rising and setting sun, the twinkfcl 

stars and lighted windows, and hears the charJ 

ing picture story which has been woven abol 

the Missions and Ramona by Mr. T. P. Gel 

the lessee and manager, a man possessed oil 

soul and loving reverence for the past and 

memory of Ramona. 

His presence in the place is a delight toj| 
visitors with whom his patience and pains 
inexhaustible. He is a sunny, kindly man, ai 
his daily lecture on the history of the old how 
with its memories of Ramona, is a const 
treat to all that enter its restored and beautifJ 
walls. 

In a quaint little sitting room, whose wail 
portraits, one finds the following wholesoi 



iut in the Patio the bees are buzzing around the kitchen door and all is 
lalm and peaceful that one involuntarily stops to rest. A mocking bird 
a near-by tree attracts you with a sad, wicrd call, like a cry from the past, 

calling long, summer days, when only the sun and the bees were awake; 



so 
in 



eyes 



I nff warn moonlight nights, when filmy mantillas draped coyly over velvet 
and gallant caballeros played serenades outside grilled windows; days 
hen everything was "Manana" (to-morrow), when love and beauty, toil 
j 1^^,. struggles, mixed in a kaleidoscope of real and unreal. It recalls 
the evening in Mrs. Jackson's beautiful story when Ramona crept with her 
Indian, lover in the dusk across the plaza where they had tethered their In- 
dian ponies, and looking into the windows of the house, saw the lights. They 
entered and asked Father Gaspara to marry them. The good Padre saw at 
once that Alessandro was an Indian, but Ramona was so much fairer, so evi- 
dently refined in her beauty, that the priest asked her if she were an Indian. 
"My mother was an Indian," she replied proudly. And so they were mar- 
ried to live only a few years together — Ramona and her Indian lover. The 
world knows their story and tender sympathies are touched once again by 
the associations and surroundings, while the beautiful San Diego Harbor of 
the Sun, into which Cabrillo sailed nearly 400 years ago, stretches away 
from Ramona's Marriage Place, the bright waters always shining under skies 
are always blue. 



Wishing Well 



Smile awhile, and while you smile 

Another smiles; 
And soon there's miles and miles 

Of smiles; 
And life's worth while 

Because you smile." 




THE CALL OF CALIFORNIA 

By John S. McGroarty 

in she called, and from far away, 
Over desert and mountain keep, 

ands where the wind-swept prairies 
And the ice-clasped torrents sleep. 



lay, 



A motto above the door reads: 



She dreamed of her bounty brimming o'er 
With its largess of field and plain, 
then from the sweep of the sunlit shore 
Her fond lips called again. 



"This is a good place to sit down 
and write a letter home to Moth 



er. 



?» 




Old Spanish 
Oven, 

Ramona's 
Marriage Place 



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heard her voice, like a golden chime, 
^M And in dreams they saw her rise 
From the golden streams in a golden clime 
Neath the blue of faithful skies. 



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MOJAVE'S REPRESENTATIVES AT THE FAIR 

Ervin Ellsworth Richard.cn and Marion Pauline Richardson, .elected by .he 

Kingdom of the Sun to represent the Mo,ave De.er. a. the open- 

ing o( the San Diego Panama-Cahfornia Expo.Uion 







These little cousins making merry at Hallowe'en-time, at 
Mrs. Ervin Ellsworth Richardson's autiful desert villa over- 
looking the Mojave River, Victorville. Cal. Below is seen In 
the distance the Mojave River — the nourishing source of lif»> 
of the desert region. 





TOASTS TO SAN DIEGO 



THE HARBOR OF THE SUN 

The sunlight of the morning across the far hills broke, 
From the dawn the veils of mist fell and faded as I woke; 
The sea was bathed with glory in a sweep of swirling fire. 
And I wandered with my soul in the Land of Heart's Desire. 

The lemon was in blossom, and, shimmered in between, 
Glowed the gold of the orange and the olive's flash of green; 
I could see them from the waters that rippled, blue and bright 
On the Bay of San Diego in the golden morning light. 

Til still as God has made it in the gladness of His dreams, 
With the never-ending summer that forever o'er it gleams — 
The mystic seas beyond it in the sunlight's golden fire, 
And the Bay of San Diego in the Land of Heart's Desire. 

JOHN S. McGROARTY. 









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WILL FIND 
CLUB ACTIVITIES 
IN SAN DIEGO 




SAN DIEGO CLUBS 

The Amphion Club was organized in September, 1893, 
by a small band of musicians and music-lovers, with the 
object of stimulating a higher degree of musical intelligence 
among its members and of elevating the musical taste of 
the community. Its membership now numbers over 600. 
The Club gives fortnightly concerts for its members, from 
the middle of October to the end of April each year, at least half of which 
are given by artists of national or international reputation. The meetings 
for these artists days are held at the Spreckels Theatre, and the local meet- 
ings at the Wednesday Club House. Miss Gertrude Gilbert, who is serving 
her sixth year as president, is an indefatigable worker and an enthusiast 
whose personal efforts have brought the Club to its present position as the 
leading musical organization of the city. 



WOMAN'S PRESS CLUB. 

By Josephine Page Wright 

Three years ago Mrs. S. C. Payson of this city recognized the desira 
bility of a local organization to which women of creative-artiilic abilih 
would be eligible. Mrs. Payson believes that all worthy dreams should seek 
material expression. She called to her aid Mrs. H. P. Newman, Mrs. Arthur 
Ballentine, Mrs. C. S. Tainter. Mrs. M. E. Fagin and other representati 
women, and within a fortnight the San Diego Press Club had been organized 
Later it seemed desirable to change the name to the Woman's Press Club 

The club has been remarkably strong from its inception, and today in 
eludes in its membership many who have won permanent success in their 
chosen lines of literary and artistic effort. 

The purposes of the club are to promote fellowship among women writers, 
composers of music and illustrators, and to be the medium through which 
members and their guests may meet professional visitors of note. The mem- 
bership is limited to those who are writing, composing music or illustrating 
ror publication. 

Meetings of the club are held regularly twice a month, and special meet 
ings are called when distinguished writers or artists from other cities arc 
invited to address the members. The first meeting of the month is devoted 
to informal discussion of the technique of some form of writing. The market 



Mrv Ar-by Butler and Womm'i Relief Corpa of 

the (, A R during t.rand Kncampment 

at San Diego ■ 




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possibilities of this form are also considered. The second meeting is gi Ven 
to the reading and criticism of original manuscripts. 

To membership in the Woman's Press Club has been attracted writers 
of plays that have had successful production on the coasl: and in the east, 
authors of novels that have had paying sales, writers of verse and short 
stories that find a place on the index page of standard magazines every 
month. 

Present officers of the Woman's Press Club are: 

President, Mrs. Thos. B. Wright. 

Vice-President, Mrs. John B. Starkey. 

Recording Secretary, Miss Rebecca Strutton. 

Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Edgar H. Brown. 

Treasurer, Mrs. John J. Hetzell. 

STONEWALL JACKSON CHAPTER NO. 476, 
UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY 

On the first day of May, 1901, a loyal band of women met and organ- 
ized themselves into a chapter, there being several other chapters throughout 

California. 

Mrs. Mattie S. Davis, assisted by Maj. Hugh Gwynn, an esteemed vet- 
eran, were leading spirits in organizing this Chapter. They met in Hotel 
Brewster. Mr. Daggett, the proprietor, being a Southern man, extended the 
ladies a temporary meeting place. There were seventeen charter members. 

The name of Stonewall Jackson was selected. Mrs. Stonewall Jackson 
lived for a time in San Diego, and was made our first honorary president. 

The objedts of our organization, as embodied in our constitutions, are 
social, benevolent, historical and memorial. 

It is to bring together all women throughout our Bay City, San Diego, 
who are qualified, wives, daughters or nieces of Confederate soldiers: to unite 
these women by similar ties of loyalty to memories and principles; to fulfill 
duties of sacred charity toward Confederate veterans and their descendants; 
to colledt and preserve material for the history of the war between the Con- 
federate States and the United States of America, especially deeds of hero- 
ism of Southern women; to unite with Confederate veterans in the endeavor 
that American history shall be properly taught in the public schools of 
the states; to erect monuments to heroes of the Confederacy. 

Benevolence is our leading work, there being many old soldiers and their 
families who have drifted out here away from home and a state that cares 
for Confederate soldiers. We bring sunshine into many homes. We have 
several who are in need. 

We have a plot in Mount Hope cemetery where twenty-two veterans and 
some wives are buried. Each year, on May 30th, we hold appropriate ser- 
vices and decorate each grave with evergreens, wreaths and flowers and the 
flags of the Confederacy and flags of the United States. We are planning 
to erect a monument to our dead on the plot. 

We meet the first Friday of each month, at the San Diego Club House, 
Ninth and Broadway, excepting the summer months of July and August. 

o/o? Ur present officers ar e: Mrs. Kathryn Carter Blankenburg, president, 
3685 Eighth St.; Mrs. Mary K. Carter, first vice-president; Mrs. Mattie 
S. Davis, second vice-president; Mrs. Cella Reinhardt, recording secretary; 
Mrs. Harry C. Woodward, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Mary D. Good- 
win, treasurer; Mrs. J. D. Nicklas, registrar; Mrs. Mary R. Wright, his- 
tonan. 

ZLAC ROWING CLUB. 

The Zlac Rowing Club of San Diego is the oldest and largest rowing club 

on the Pacific coast having a membership entirely composed of young women. 

It was founded over fifteen years ago, and has grown from the original four 

members to^a number considerably over one hundred. The officers of the 
Uub are: 

Mrs. Warren M. Crouse, Commodore. 
Mrs. Marcus' Lyon Miller, President. 
Miss Marion Mitchell, Vice-President. 
Miss Willowdean Chatterson, Secretary. 
Mrs. Albert A. Frost, Treasurer. 
Miss Fanny Jessop, Housekeeper. 

The Club is composed of seven crews, each with its own coxwain and 
crew officers and the rowing is done in forty-foot, eight-oared barges, of 
which the Club owns two. There is much rivalry between the crews, and 
the sight of the two barges, manned by the crews in black and gold, is a 
familiar one on the smooth waters of San Diego Bay. 



THE 
BEAUTIFUL 

[YR9LEAN 
TERRACE 




Do Not Miss 
This Charm- 
ing Place 



sti 



Iessop's Giant Clock — On Fifth street, in front 
f Tessop's Jewelry Store, stands a giant clock — the 

host unique in America. It is 21 feet high, and on 
huge dials tells the time simultaneously of the 
rincipal cities of nations all over the world. It 

took 15 months to build it — at a cost of $3,000 — all 

the intricate parts being made in the Jessop shop. It 
< jeweled with San Diego native gems. It is one 
f the interesting sights of the city. The firm is 

dad to furnish free colored postals of this clock to 

visiting tourists. 

Old Mission — Seven miles from Fifth and Broad- 
Liy can be reached by carriage. One of the most 
listorical and interesting places in the country. It 
was founded by Junipera Serra, Father of the Fran- 
ciscan Order. The adobe walls of the old mission 
are relics of a bygone period. The old bells are 
in the belfry, and can be seen by the tourist. 
Indian school is conducted by the Sisters of St. 

>eph. 

Point Loma — The road from San Diego to Point 
Loma is one of the best in the bay region, and the 
trip may be taken by carriage or by the watetr 
route. The trip affords a succession of delightful 
views and no better outing can be imagined than 
one to Point Loma, taking in the Lighthouse, where 
at low tide one may gather a variety of sea shells; 
and from the promontory sheltering San Diego Bay, 
view the entire city of Coronado, and, with the 
quaintly-shaped Coronado islands, the superb pano- 
rama of land, ocean and bay is a delight to the 
lover of nature. 

La Jolla — (La Ho-ya), two thousand population 
—which for climate, scenic and sanitary conditions 
is matchless, is reached after a few minutes' ride 
from the center of the city, along the shores of our 
beautiful harbor and ocean front. Thousands of 
tourists annually visit this beautiful suburb — some 
to enjoy a season of rest and pleasure in this favored 
locality-, and some for just a brief view of the many 
attractions to be found here. No one should leave 
San Diego without seeing the caves, the bathing 
cove, Alligator Head, and Witches Cauldron and 
the never-to-be-forgotten view of mountains, valleys, 
plains and sea from the top of Mount Soledad. La 
Jolla has her golf links, club house and reading 
rooms for the entertainment of visitors, and the exhi- 
bition and the Biological Station is well worth a visit. 




National Highway 




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Raraona's Marriagre Place 



Fount and Garden — Ramona's Marriage Place 




The Don't-Miss-Places 
in San Diego 






Indian Lace Maker 
Pala Mission 



Suggested by the 
Kingdom of the Sun 

Laces for the world, made in South- 
ern California, and by Indian 

women 

At the Pala Mission it is 
now possible to buy the beau- 
tiful foreign laces made by 
our own people, and made 
with the same firmness and 
evenness, and in the same 
beautiful old designs as are 
found in the best lace-making 
districts abroad. 

It may be wondered why 
the Indian women should be 
fitted to do this delicate and 
exact work, but anyone who 
has ever watched the making 
of a fine Indian basket, knows 
what patience and precision, 
and what innate sense of art 
is required for the success of 
such work. 



Wishing Well — Ramona's Marriage Place 




Old Town — The most hallowed and his- 
torical spot in all California — where the 
brown robed Franciscan Father, Junipera 
Serra, first planted the cross in 1769 — 
where a monument marks the spot where 
General Fremont first planted the United 
States flag in 1846. Here you will see the 
old chapel and the bells brought from 
Spain in 1802; the picturesque old dam 
built by the early fathers; and the first 
palm trees planted in California; the old 
grave yard; the old jail; the first brick 
house; old Fort Stockton, and the "Mar- 
riage Place of Ramona," now restored to 
its former condition, with its thick adobe 
walls, heavy mission timbers, its hide- 
bound rafters and beautiful flowered court 
yard. Here you can see California as it 
was a hundred years ago, hear the inter- 
esting stories of the Missions and see the 
oldest collection of Indian Mission pictures 
in the world, besides many other interest- 
ing features. Old Town is reached by 
cars marked "Ramona's Home," Route 8, 
leaving down town every 15 minutes. 










Lilies at the Beautiful 
Mission Cliff Gardens 



Carreta — Ramona's Marriage Place. 







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THE YUCCA PALM OF THE DESERT 

Where the Kingdom of the Sun i» Edited 



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A rare specimen slab of the Yucca, 
showing its peculiar configurations, 
now used in its desert home, to dis- 
play the name of the magazine 



The Yucca is the hardest known 
wood, and several saws were broken 
in the effort to secure this unique 
section from a mammoth Yucca tree 



W. M. IRWIN 

Publicity Representative and Exposition Commissioner 

for San Diego County. 

\ genuine booster for Southern California, and San Diego ^particular, 

I mtMmmmmm 

terested public. 



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The Smithsonian Institution at Washington, the greatest authority in 
America on vegetation and animals indigent to the many various countries 
ana soils after exhaustive investigation declares there are but two regions 

° n ^ i e R. e wnere tne yucca grows — the mesa lands of Asia, near Thibet, 
ana in that section of what was once known as the great American desert— 
southeastern California and parts of Nevada and Arizona. And it is seen at 
its best in the portion of the desert lands in San Bernardino County. 







i'l 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BUILDING 









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p 

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JOHN S. McGROARTY 
Poet and Historian 

California has ever been the Mecca toward which the artistic and literary 
temperament has been irresistibly drawn — and brilliant has been the galaxy 
of men and women that have made names for themselves in the literary 
world, who have succumbed to the lure and fascination of its romantic his- 
tory and have come to abide with us. In these latter days there has come to 
us another such gifted soul, the poet and historian, John S. McGroarty, who 
lias drank deeply of the Pierian spring of California's romanticism and cast 
into delightful imagery and beauty the story of its Missions. 



IN COMMEMORATION OF THE 
GREATEST ENGINEERING TRIUMPH 

OF THE AGES 
AND MOST WONDERFUL ACCOM- 
PLISHMENT OF HUMAN ENDEAVOR 

IN ALL HISTORY 
THE BUILDING OF THE PANAMA CANAL 






THE SAN DIEGO PANAMA-CALIFORNIA EXPOSITION 

OPENS WIDE ITS PORTALS 

AND INVITES THE WORLD TO JOIN WITH IT 

IN CELEBRATING THIS EPOCH-MAKING EVENT 



DEDICATION PRAYER 

OLORD, our God, Thy mighty hand hath made our country free; 
From all her broad and happy land may praise arise to Thee. 
Fulfill the promise of her youth, her liberty defend; 
By law and order, love and truth America befriend ! 

The strength of every state increase in Union's golden chain, 
Her thousand cities fill with peace, her million fields with grain. 
The virtues of our mingled blood in one new people blend; 
By unity and brotherhood, America befriend! 

suffer not her feet to stray; but guide her untaught might; 
That she may walk in peaceful day. and lead the world in light. 
Bring down the proud, lift up the poor, unequal ways amend; 
By justice, nation-wide and sure, America befriend! 

Thro' all the waiting land proclaim Thy gospel of good will; 
And may the music of Thy name in ev'ry bosom thrill. 
O'er hill and vale, from sea to sea, Thy holy reign extend; 



v 



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By faith and hope and charity, America befriend! 



Henry van Dyke 



NEW YEAR'S 
MCMXV 



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THE CALL OF CALIFORNIA. 

By John S. McGroarty 

Of old she called with her lips of song, 

She called with her breath of musk 
From peaks where the sunlight lingered long, 

And the vales in the purpled dusk; 
She called to the seas with their tides of tang, 

To the ships of the far-off fleet. 
And they came in the lure of the song she sang. 

With their white sails, to her feet. 

So, like a mother with bursting breast, 

She claimed the brood of the seas, 
And the flaming lips of her wild love pressed 

Upon them, about her knees; 
She crooned them to sleep on her bosom fair. 

Where their happy hearts were lain, 
And they laughed in her eyes that wrapped them there. 
Like their old, warm skies of Spain. 

Again she called, from far away. 

Over desert and mountain keep. 
In lands where the wind-swept prairies lay, 

And the ice-clasped torrents sleep, 
They heard her voice, like a golden chime, 

And in dreams they saw her rise 
From the golden streams in a golden clime 

'Neath the blue of faithful skies. 

Yet, oft in the light of the mellow moons 

From the jaspered heavens hung, 
'Mid the tinkle of soft Castilian tunes 

And bells from the Mission rung, 
She dreamed of her bounty brimming o'er 

With its largess of field and plain, 
And then from the sweep of the sunlit shore 

Her fond lips called again. 

They came, and she dowered with spendthrift hand, 

The hopes of their wildest dreams, 
And she flung at their feet the golden sands 

That slept in her shining streams — 
Saxon and Teuton and Celt that trod 

The paths of her treasured springs, 
With shoon of silver their feet she shod 

And clothed them in robes of kings. 

So hath she called with her lips of song, 

Of old, with her breath of musk, 
From hills where the sunlight lingers long, 

And the vales in the purpled dusk; 
And so from her soul's unwearied love 

Rings the voice with its olden thrill; 
From the seas below and the desert above, 

She is calling, calling still. 

— John S. 9vfcGroarty, writer and owner of the Historical 
Mission 'Play, staged at San Gabriel. 



&± 



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THE SEVEN SOUTHERN COUNTIES. 

Written for the Kingdom of the Sun. 

Five years ago the city of San Diego was equipped with a 1 ,400 acre park 
w ith which it did not have the vaguest idea of what to do. The principal 
reason was that only politeness and local pride allowed the use of the word 
"park" as a title. In reality it was 1,400 acres of adobe soil cut by two 
deep canyons and several ravines opening into them. There was a flourish- 
ing growth of cactus and sagebrush, and along at one side were a few pepper 
trees gasping for breath and wondering when it was going to rain. 

Today this is Balboa Park. The entire upper mesa is covered with 
white-walled buildings, surmounted by domes and towers and arches from 
which old mission bells swing. The streets and plazas are lined with trees 
and lawns and flowers. On the buildings are growing a thousand vines— not 
vines which are green for a few months of the year, but vines which grow the 
year around, and all that time bear brilliant blooms, crimson roses and pur- 
ple bougainvilleas and gold and white flowers with still more startling names. 
This is the site of San Diego's Panama-California Exposition. For five 
years it has been building, and the soil which formerly baked hard and dry 
has been plowed and harrowed and drenched with a sea of water, and set out 
with trees and shrubs and vines. In that section of the country, the extreme 
southern tip of the California coast, there is never frost in winter, nor severely 
hot weather in summer, nor protracted rainy season nor destructive gale. 
No reasonable flower could help growing twelve months in the year. If the 
makers of the calendar had supplied fourteen or fifteen months, there would 
be a fourteen or fifteen months' growing season. _ . . , 

Climate has been the steadiest worker on the staff of the Exposition, and 
also has been the most effective. Strong as are the appeals of many other 
phases of the work, the most vivid impression is that of the extraordinary 
beauty of the scene, the rare harmonizing of the buildings with the natural 
setting. Get the picture in mind. Realize that from the whole expanse of 
mesa one looks to north to south and east and sees the snow-capped peaks 
of California and old Mexico, or looks to the west and sees the rolling Pacific, 
less than a mile away, and sees it all under the amazing blue of the southern 
California sky. One walks or rides up the easy grades from the waterfront 
and arrives at the edge of the Canyon Cabrillo. thick with palm and slim 
cypress and acacia and eucalyptus. Far beneath is a quiet pool, and from 
the pool rise seven great arches, their level tops the surface of a long bridge, 
its approaches decked out with flowering shrubbery. Across the bridge— 
the Puente Cabrillo— the road leads into a memorial archway, and on the 
other side of that the city of Old Spain is spread out. 

That is the definite impression. Perhaps there is something inthe 
balmy air, the fragrance of the flowers or the oranges, the cry of the birds 
in the canyon, the languor the northerner feels once he strikes the southern 
coast, but whatever the artificial aid the impression is a dreamy one of the 
old Spanish city of three or four centuries ago. This first plaza has a great 
cathedral at the left, a somber mission at the right. But flowers are there, 
pigeons flutter about the high tower and swoop about the arch where a 
couple of old, old mission bells are swinging. Cowled monks stalk solemnly 
along the arcade, a caballero, brightly clad, saunters about the cool patio 
1 from whose shady alcove comes the tinkle of a mandolin or the click of a 
Castanet— and then around the corner dashes a troupe of Spanish dancing 
girls with a whirl of skirts and confetti. 

The Exposition might have built the "established" sort of structures, 
and in doing so produced something entirely without special interest or ma- 
terial value. Instead, the design was for a typical Spanish Colonial City, 
partly in the somber mission style, partly in the more ornamental residence 
style, partly in the gorgeous splendor of the ornate cathedral. It is a rare 
tribute to the possibilities of Spanish Colonial art that the several types of 
the general school blend in such astonishing harmony. The principal fea- 
ture is that these buildings, whose construction is the first important renais- 
sance of a fine old school of architecture which has been undeveloped for 
more than a century, are in perfect harmony with the landscape. It was 
in Southern California that the Spanish mission reached its heights of beauty. 
And exactly as the architecture of this Exposition Beautiful is new, the 
idea back of the whole Exposition is new. 

Back in 1 876 Philadelphia held a Centennial Exposition to celebrate the 
one-hundredth year of American independence. That started the exposition 
idea in this country, and from time to time other cities have held their 
world's fairs. In beautiful buildings there have been housed exhibits of the 
varied industries of America and of other lands, manufacturing of every sort 
to show the advances made from earlier days. 






I 









A few years ago the department of agriculture came to a realization that 
it was about time for some real attention to the dominant industry of the 
country, for an exhibit that would show what the American farmer was 
doing and what other American farmers ought to be doing and why there 
should be a larger movement back to the land. And every one of these 
exhibits has been housed. Every one has been able to show only the pro- 
ducts of the farm, and it cannot be said that the result of the land shows 
has been anything except to show the products of the farm without stim- 
ulating to any great degree a rejuvenation of the great basic industry of civil- 
ization. 

San Diego, remember, is the first port of call for steamers which travel 

up the Pacific coast from the Panama Canal. That means that San Diego 
should benefit most largely from the canal, and that, by reason of proximity 
and by comparatively easy mountain grades, it is through San Diego that 
the development of the southwest must come. With this realization the Ex- 
position started out to contribute its share to developing the southwest, and 
doing so, by showing to the world what the southwest holds for the future. 

The agricultural exhibits of the past, the stimulants to a "back to the 
land" movement, have been failures in large measure. It was decided that 
this could be traced to exactly the same state of affairs which sent world's 
fairs visitors home with an excellent impression of the Pike or the Midway 
and no impression at all of the exhibits. In brief, the exhibits were not 
interesting. There was no reason why the visitor should remember them. 

At San Diego there was developed an understanding that there was 
nothing about an exhibit of tea boxes, or canned goods, or stacks of oranges 
that could hope to compete with the Circassian beauties or the dogfaced boy 
or the Streets of Cairo when it came to attracting the crowd. None of the 
stock exhibits were materially different from exhibits that might be seen in 
the grocery store or the factory around the corner back home. And so a 
new idea came about, an Exposition of "processes, not products," something 
that would interest the visitor and keep him interested. 

Take the case of the agricultural features for example. At every worlds 
fair there has been an exhibit of agricultural implements, maybe a few of 
them, maybe a large number. They were standing in a hall, and occasion- 
ally a demonstrator wheeled them around so the visitor could see them from 
a new angle. Except that they were in a new setting, they might just as 
well have been at one of the factories' salesrooms. The man who intended 
to buy new machinery, who went to the fair with that definite plan in mind, 
probably took an interest in the exhibit, but he would have had quite as 
much interest in a visit to the factory salesroom. The general public passed 
without a pause. 

Well, that is not the way agricultural implements are exhibited at San 
Diego. Down on the Alameda there is a big tract reserved by the Interna- 
tional Harvester Company. From a distance you can see the crowd gath- 
ered about it, and the crowd is standing still and looking with interest, look- 
ing not at standing machinery but at machinery in operation. 

The tract has been sown to different cereals and forage crops. Each day 
some big horse-drawn or motor-driven machine moves down the tract, and 
the visitor sees how the up-to-date farmer plows his land or cultivates his 
corn or harvests his wheat. Now that is of interest to the progressive 
farmer. He will get a new idea. He will see probably one little step in 
the procedure that saves a few minutes in every hour or a few cents in 
every dollar of gross revenue. 

And it is of interest to the farmer without so much experience. He will 
see where he can save several minutes and many cents. He will see that 
the new idea is adding to gross revenue, or that it is cutting down operating 
expense— in either case swelling net revenue, which is the main thing. He 
will see that it is possible not only to make money but to do it with less 
strain on his own physical resources. 

And there's another man that is going to be interested, the city man who 
wants to go back to the land and wants to take his wife and children with 
him. He has a hazy recollection of his boyhood on the farm or the stories 
he heard his father tell about work on a worn-out farm in New England 
before the days of scientific soil cultivation. He heard about rising long be- 
fore the sun and setting long after the sun and working all the time just as 
steadily as the sun ever shone. Also he heard about the small return and 
the semi-annual spasms of meeting a mortgage payment. Those recollec- 
tions had dampened his ardor to go back to the land. 

Now let that man look at the San Diego exhibit. Indirectly he has 
heard that times have changed and that the farmer of today is quite a dif- 
ferent man from the farmer of yesterday, but he hasn't been able to grasp 



the difference. Let him go to the outdoor exhibit out in Southern Cali- 
fornia next year, and let him see with his own eyes what the change is. 

He will see a machine doing in one hour exactly what it took his father 
and five hands a full week to do. He will see a piece of ground covered so 
fast that the farmer'does not have to worry about cutting over the meadow 
lest it rain before he can get his hay in. The reason is that he can get his 
crop cut and cured and stored before night. He will see every grain of corn 
utilized and every bit of "waste," as his father called it, made to serve its 
purpose for another crop. Old P. D. Armour of Chicago used to tell his 
friends that his stockyards "used everything but the squeal." The farmer 
of today is just as good an economist as the veteran packer was. 

This same city man, who wants to go back to the land but is afraid to 
risk it, is going to see a lot more, enough to keep him standing by that en- 
closure all day and the next day, and spending the evenings in between doing 
a lot of thinking. He is going to see those painful recollections swept away. 
He will find out that the farmer's life is not all labor and sorrow, that he 
does not have to keep his nose incessantly at the grindstone, that he does 
not have to worry at each meal over the mortgage payment due. A great 
light is going to dawn about him. 

That is a fair example of the methods. Other expositions have had tea 
exhibits — of painted boxes. San Diego's tea exhibit is a plantation of grow- 
ing saplings, sent here by Sir Thomas Lipton, with Singalese gardeners to 
tend the plants and strip and cure the leaves, and Singalese girls to serve 
the finished product. Other expositions have had large display of oranges. 
San Diego's exhibit is a citrus orchard, blooming and bearing an abundance 
of oranges and lemons and grapefruit and kumquat where the visitor can 
reach out and touch them on the trees. The exhibits of the crafts show 
the Indians weaving the rugs and shaping the pottery, the Japanese working 
at their crafts, the Russian peasants at their Koustarni arts, the vast variety 
of American crafts, all in the making. These are exhibits which count. 

Wherever possible, the exhibits are out-of-doors. A country where man 
lives outdoors throughout the year can afford to put most of its exhibits 
out in the open, and in doing so guarantee a little better attention than the 
best indoor exhibit could have. Probably the out-of-door display, merging 
with the astonishing horticultural display along the canyons, is the most 
interesting single feature of the Exposition. 

Directly east of the Alameda, where most of the outdoor exhibits are 
placed, is the Isthmus. In other days it was the Pike or the Midway, but 
it is still extant, and very much so. With the exception of the long roller 
coaster and one or two old-timers of like indispensable character, everything 
on the Isthmus, from the Calle Ancon to the Calle Colon, is new, the villages 
of the Pueblo Indians and the wandering tribes, the Hawaiians, the Mexi- 
, the Chinese quarter, the reproduced mining camp of the gold rush of 
'49, the southern plantation where some double-X black mammies are pre- 
paring real southern corn pone and similar delicacies as fast as the Mexicans 
down the street are cooking their tamales. There is plenty on the Isthmus 

to interest. , , . 

But, more important, there are other things to interest, and the beher is 
that these other things are going to be of permanent interest and permanent 
value to the visitors and to the southwest. It is a big spectacle that San 
Diego is presenting to the world, and a mighty stage for it. Also, com- 
mencing on January 1 and remaining open until the tap of midnight that 
announces 1916, it is a spectacle that can be seen when it is winter or spring 
or summer or fall— elsewhere. In San Diego it is always June. 



cans 



THE CALIFORNIA POPPY. 

Flower of the west-land with calyx of gold, 
Swung in the breeze over lace-woven sod; 
Filled to the brim with the glory of God 
All that its wax-petaled chalice can hold, 
This was the birth of it: on the brown plain 
The sun dropped a kiss in the footprint of rain. 

— 'Rose Hartwt'cke Thorpe 



THE ENTRANCING DESERT 

By Judge T. S. Van Dyke. 

Few imagine that there is a vast area in the United States where a big 
house is a nuisance and those who have one spend most of their time outside 
of it both day and night, where people travel more and farther and see more 
that pleases the eye than in the lands of abundant rain. Pierre Loti shows 
plainly in his writings that he loves the desert as well as the Arab and those 
who live on the deserts of our country soon learn to like the free out-of-door 
life in spite of many disadvantages. 

MUCH PATIENCE-SOME CAPITAL 

The desert is no place for the ordinary pioneer with a few hundred dol- 
lars, and there is plenty of tribulation in store for the man with thousands. 
The extreme dryness of the air seems to stop the pollination without regard 
to the amount of water at the root. Almost everything that can be raised 
has to be handled differently from that in the rainy lands, or even in the 
semi-arid lands, and one must have money enough with which to live until 
he learns, or he will have a rich foretaste of eternal torment. 

With money, patience and a study of conditions, the rose will blossom 
and the desert can be made beautiful as well as profitable far beyond what 
is known as profit in the rainy lands. But this is not the beauty of the 
desert. It is something surpassing that and due to the absence of water, 
instead of the abundance of it. On the deserts of Arizona and eastern Cal- 
ifornia the air is so dry and rain so rare that even dew is rarely seen. 

CLOUD BEAUTY. 

Except for a few mornings after a rain, not a trace of dew can be found 
at daybreak, even on the leather wagon cushion. The consequence is that 
the air is so transparent from lack of moisture than even the few clouds that 
sometimes fleck the blue are clearer in outline, with more depth and purity 
of color, than those of the skies, while their rapid evaporation at one eleva- 
tion and quick formation in another, make a variety of action unseen else- 
where. Sometimes cumuli gather suddenly on the horizon and mount toward 
the zenith in all the tints of opal and pearl, make a vast display for an hour, 
and instantly fade into the blue. Sometimes clouds form suddenly above 
one and drop a misty veil, wavering toward the earth and vanishing in evap- 
oration before reaching it, and at long intervals a genuine storm may give a 
good rain, but nine-tenths of the days throughout the year are clear and 
half the rest would be called fine days on the Atlantic Coast. 

MIRAGE LAKES 

Heat, dry air, bright sun and flat ground arc the conditions of a mirage 
worth seeing, and on the level parts of the deserts they form such perfe<5t 
imitations of water and trees that those who think them essentials of a good 
landscape can see the reality improved on. 

The best are on the great flats at the mouth of the Colorado River, where 
leagues of ground are perfectly level and bare. Silvery lakes studded with 
little islands surrounded by shrubbery suddenly rise to view, not miles away, 
but only a few rods, with ducks drifting within shooting distance on the 
smoothest of water and solemn bitterns along the shore. 

Heavy vegetation deadens artistic color, in summer the more delicate 
tones being drowned in a sea of green, and in the autumn lost in the glare 
of violet tints that, compared to those of the desert are like the blasts of a 
trumpet to the tenderest notes of a human voice. It also destroys too many 
of the lines of the hills, the infinite number of which on the desert make 
vibration of light and disintegration of color that please the most exacting 
artist, but leave him in despair when he attempts to reproduce the effects. 

Vegetation makes too many flat surfaces. For color at its best value 
you must go where there is not rain enough to make vegetation that can 
bind the soil, so that as fast as it is formed by the decomposition of the rocks 
it is carried off by the winds and occasional rains to the plains below. This 
allows all the minerals of the hills to beam with power undimmed, while the 
air is so clear that great mountains vanish only in the curvatures of the 
earth with the gulches that seam their sides showing both depth and outline 
at fifty miles or more. When intense heat makes the air quiver so far above 
the surface of the plain that everything is seen through its rapid vibration, 
then color warps the hills in harmonious gradations and blendings more 
subtle even than those the setting sun can weave on fleecy clouds, all in in- 
finite softness, yet allowing every cleft and crag to retain its distinctness of 
line. 

WONDERFUL LIGHTS AND SHADES. 

In the coolness of morning, when the sun swings like a ball of fire over 
the eastern ranges, quartz ledges glitter like the angles of an iceberg, iron 
runs the scale from palest rose to deepest carmine as the sunlight leaps from 
crag to crag, and brightening lights from the red oxide of copper chase each 
other over cliff and scar until the whole seems glowing with celestial fires. 
But when the air begins to dance in wavy lines of heat, the bright red of 
iron is softened and the red oxide of copper is clouded with gray, while the 
green of the carbonate shifts and live quartz fades into silvery gray, and 



lime, cobalt, antimony and other minerals blend their varied hues with the 
rest and form a color harmony that the desert alone can show. 

And, as the air vibrates more and more under the ascending sun, a golden 
haze sometimes steals over the whole until at noon it seems a land of dreams, 
sleeping under guard of a thousand enchanted castles. But often this haze 
is blue — not the blue of distant mountains in the rainy countries, which is 
generally a change only in the green of vegetation, leaving a mere flat sur- 
face, something we rarely sec on true desert. This blue is a light tint of 
cobalt through which all the colors of the hills, with every line, angle, gulch, 
and spur, arc seen as plainly as at any time. The effect is much like that 
of looking through blue glasses, and cannot be imitated by any kind of paint. 

A COLOR CLIMAX. 

Evening often brings the climax of all coloring. As the sun nears the 
horizon the rugged ranges of porphyry and granite seem to move out of the 
slumbrous veil of noon and take a tender pink on every tower and castle 
with soft tints of hyacinth in every canyon and basin. This pink sheen 
steals over every ridge and spur, and when the sun has almost touched the 
earth's farthest verge, the whole shifts rapidly into strontium fire with the 
blue deepening in the depressions, and just as the sun sinks crimson subdues 
the glow of strontium and the blue of the depths shifts into velvet. Then, 
as the last beams weaken in the glowing west, crimson and purple spread 
rapidly over the whole, lasting a moment after the sun is out of sight. Light 
tints of rose beam on the further hills a little longer, but the nearer ones 
change rapidly to dull red, brown and gray, and the brilliant show is over 
—lasting at its best from three to five minutes. 

NATURE PAINTING. 

This is one of the strangest of all light effecfts. The sun is not red at 
all, though sometimes a faint orange in a sky of deeper orange or bright yel- 
low. There is no red upon the hills like that seen sometimes on a window 
glass from a red sun. You can see the gray or brown of the hills with every 
line and crag as clearly cut as at any time. And between you and the hills 
ten or twenty miles away you can see rosy mists as you sometimes can on 
the coast of California. You can discover no carmine or rose or strontium 
in the air in any direction, and the be$t effedts are not opposite the sun, but 
often at quite an angle to the path of its beams. The sky behind the moun- 
tain is always opal, yellow or green— never blue— of transparency most mar- 
velous, becoming more so as the green or yellow grows stronger as the hght 
fades over the earth. No paint can come within sixty per cent of the light 
on the hills, even on ordinary evenings. The thinnest and most transparent 
of water colors is a sorry muss compared with the reality, and on some 
evenings the color is so high and so pure that any painting of it is simply 
ridiculous. The conditions for the best display are a perfectly dry, still air, 
free from any trace of dust, which, on my part of the desert, are most com- 
mon in the evening of a warm mid-winter day. 

NO PEST OF INSECTS. 

Such surroundings, with almost total absence of mud or ice or snow, 
make outdoor life easy on the greater part of the desert, \\here I live 
there are no fleas, bed bugs, moths or mosquitos, and such is the case gen- 
erally, though mosquitoes may be bred in places where by bay irrigation and 
in some parts of the bottoms of the Colorado River they need no irrigation. 
But in every place I know there are enough house-flies in spring and fall to 
balance the account. The house-fly scientist who tells you that flies breed 
only in filth, by destroying which you will get clear o them, could learn some- 
thing here where filth is an impossibility. A beefsteak two inches thick, 
thrown on a line, will dry up sweet in a short time at any time of the year 
and stable manure is like shavings from kiln-dried lumber in a planing mill. 
The abundance of flies is coincident with the amount of annual vegetation 
-that is, on the amount of rain, that it is quite clear their breeding in some 
way depends upon it. When we have rain enough to make plenty of flowers 
in springwe have flies, not by the hundreds or thousands, but by the million. 
This year, with few flowers, but more stable manure than ever, there are 
hardly any. It has been this way during the eight years I have been here, 
and in a year of flowers you may find them in swarms where no trace of man 
or any of his works, or any filth or rubbish o any kind, can be found. 

The heat of summer really makes the desert still more an out-of-door 
land. There is little use of trying to avoid it by staying in the house You 
are generally more comfortable outside in the shade and breeze The one 
who suffers most is the one who sits around and fans and takes cooling 
drinks. As heat is our most valuable asset, we accept it with composure. 
Heat, sunlight and water practically on tap, are what makes farming on the 
desert so profitable, and on most of it the loss from rainy weather hail- 
storms, etc.. is nominally nothing. The elevation-two thousand fee -and 
the extreme dry air. with a breeze a certainty, make it quite endurable, and 
alfalfa gains fifty cents an acre per day over cooler climates. It is the land 
for perfedt health. No children's diseases, colds, coughs-and epidemics ot 
all sorts are almost unknown during this summer heat. 







lu 



DESERT GARDENS. 

Though there are places where scarcely a living thing of the animal or 
vegetable world exists for many a league, the desert is not all desolation 
In many parts one who loves out-of-doors and the study of nature can find 
plenty to amuse him. There is no place where one can go or cut-across 
crosslots so easily as here, even with the automobile, and over much of it 
even a bicycle can comfortably be run. It takes but a short time to see a 
country just as nature left it, no sheep, no fires, no devastation of any kind, 
no track of man, no hoboes' nests, picnic rubbish or billboards. In Spring, 
after a light rainfall, much of the desert is gay with poppies, evening prim- 
roses, lilies, bluebells, daisies and scores of other flowers that make a rapid 
growth and flower, even though they can not make a stalk of quarter size. 
A little later the perennials bloom without regard to the amount of ram, 
some like the creosote-bush, a number like the rose family, with its sunny 
green leaves covered with garden bloom almost as large and bright as it there 

had been abundant rain. 

Many plants seem at first but a sorry attempt of nature to atone for 
her great failure of moisture, yet most of them one learns to love as much 
as some of the more imposing displays of other lands. Few greens surpass 
the feathery delicacy of the greasewood and mesquite. 1 he rosy Hower that 
tips the straggling arms of ecatilla would be attractive in any garden. Few 
greens are more refreshing than that of the pala verde, illumined with the 
bloom of spring. Waving afar like a golden torch through the dancing heat, 
the towering plume of the mescal opens new views of nature to one who 
thinks he knows her well, and among the blazing rocks that almost rival the 
sun with their fiery radiation, the green arms of the petaya, or great zahuaro, 
rising far above all else, teach him the art of pinning his artistic faith to the 
land where he was borned. . 

One learns to love even the cactus, which at first glance is so forbidding. 
Almost every variety bears a lovely flower, some bearing a close resemblance 
to the rose, and varying in color from the purest gold to creamy white and 
from deepest crimson to the tenderest pink. On some the flowers are nearly 
three inches across and so dense as to hide the thorny limbs that bear them. 
The marvel is that the flowers are about the same size and quantity after a 
winter of practically no rain as after the ground has had a fair wetting. It 
is much the same with the fruit, which never fails on the prickly pear and 
a few other varieties. Few imagine that it is good to eat and people have 
died on the desert from want of knowledge. By impaling it on a sharp 
stick you can cut it off and peel it with a knife very quickly, without touch- 
ing any of the spines. 

WHERE THE ORIOLE SINGS. 

In most places there is far more animal life on the desert than one would 
suppose possible. Brilliant lizards flash over the driest ground and delicate 
little wrens and thrushes flit among the spines of the cactus. The mocking- 
bird and the oriole sing us their songs of spring, and the meadow lark soon 
appears when you get an alfalfa patch started. The horned lark and the 
linnet, with many a sparrow and fly-catcher, are here and the chaparral- 
cock and the liveliest little chipmunks ever seen scamper about by day, with 
the whipporwill, the bat, and the owl pitching about in the twilight. And 
who would suppose that the dove was a lover of the desert? You may think 
you have seen doves before, but you never did. He is far more in love with 
leagues of barrenness than with the summer green of the rainy climates. In 
years of rain, enough to produce an average growth of the annuals, he is 
here in surprising numbers, breeding in the thinnest brush of the rockiest 
hills and traveling miles for water. In some parts the white-winged dove 
of Sonora, a lovely bird, larger than the common dove, also comes to spend 
the summer, and sometimes the delicate little Inca dove, in soft cinnamon 
and ashes of roses with shell-shaped edgings, crosses our southern barrier to 
keep the others company. It is one of the last places where one would expect 
to find the quail, yet Gambol's partridge is found in great numbers in some 
parts and is scattered almost everywhere there is brush, cactus, rocks. How 
this bright combination of blue, black, and chestnut can thrive in the hottest 
sun, without ever a drop of water that you can discover, and ply his little 
legs over scorching rocks at a pace no man can follow long, is one of the 
many puzzles of this dry region. 

ANIMAL LIFE. 

Coyotes, like foxes and even wildcats are found here, with the cottontail, 
of course, and the hare runs the sun a race out of bed, just for fun, on a 
blazing morning; sits all day in shade little better than that of the spider s 
web, and in the evening, skips gaily forth to run the sun another race to bed. 

Though the antelope and the mule deer are both found in spots, it is not 
on true desert — but who could imagine that the mountain sheep loves the 
dryest, roughest, barest and hottest of all hills of earth? Yet he was once 
everywhere on the fiery ranges that traverse the desert, and may be still 
found happy and fat on the ragged hills, whose soaring crags blaze with such 
intensity in the morning sun and beam at evening with all the tenderest tints 
of lilac and rose. 



HOME 4961 



SUNSET. MAIN 1532 




Grand Prize 1899 for Superior Tailoring 

LOUIS KIRSHBAUM 

HIGH GRADE TAILOR 
FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 



414 B Street 



San Diego, California 




So convenient when down town shopping 



Sunset, Main 760 



MME. WARD 

DRESSMAKING 

Ladies' Own Goods Made Up 
Also Altering and Remodeling 



Best Work Guaranteed 



Right in the center of town 
Suite 53, Sefton Bld^., Cor. Fifth and C Sts., San Diego 



HOME 1593 



MAIN 2578 



HENRY WIEGAND 



LADIES* TAILOR 



1165 FOURTH STREET 



SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



THE 



EREDERICKA HOME EOR THE AGED 

(INCORPORATED) 

CHULA VISTA, CALIFORNIA 




MRS. EMMA R. SAVLOR, Managing Director 

Office, 317 Timken Building, 

San Diego, Cal. 






BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Mrs. 



Emma R. Saylor 

Dr. R. B. 1 rones 



Mrs. Amelia Bridges 



Judge A. Haines 



Mr. E. J. Swayne 



PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



Dr. Geo. B. Worthington 
Dr. Robert Pollock 



Dr. George L. Prentice 
Dr. Edward C. Mann 



Mrs. Florence B. Cross, Secretary. 



PATRONESSES 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



A. S. Bridges 
Belle M. Bailey 
George Butler 



Mrs. John W. Hawley 
Mrs. H. H. Timken 
Mrs. W. Timken 
Miss Anna Kinkaid 



C. W. Ernsting 

Mrs. Jennings Verity, M. D. 

Mrs. Ellen Hitchcock Rogers 

Mrs. Sarah B. Raymond Mrs. Fedelia K. Shepherd 



( 



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F 



redericka Home for the Aged 



The inception of the Fredericka Home is due to the genius of Mrs. Emma 
R. Saylor, to whose indefatigable zeal and tireless energy is due the grati- 
fying success of the institution. The principle contemplated is that of co- 
operative partnership, which secures as absolute independence for the in- 
mates as is compatible with effective government. 

The ambition of the founder was to establish a great colony of old people 
of both sexes, to create a retreat with the home atmosphere predominating, 
yet with various interests that would bring out their best, securing to them 
by careful and sympathetic use of their activities, the greatest possible 
amount of interest in life, and giving them a proprietary right in the Home 

they are helping to create. 

For such a Home no more ideal site could have been chosen than that 
now occupied at Chula Vista, which has been rightly called the "Riviera 

of the Pacific." 

The buildings stand in the heart of a fifteen-acre lemon and orange grove 
and command a magnificent view of the mountains, ocean and the bay of 

San Diego. 

The privilege that the members have of building a two or three-room 

bungalow near the main building is a delightful one, and gives the occupant 

of these cottages a privacy and exclusiveness very much desired. 

The Fredericka Home Association was founded by Mrs. Saylor, initiat- 
ing a contributary system of insurance, which credits to the subscriber any 
amount given, which shall be available for entrance money in the event of 
such subscriber desiring to become a member later in life. 

The members of the Association not only secure themselves against a 
lonely, homeless old age, but are doing their share to make the colony the 
greatest institution of its kind in the world. It is confidently believed that 
when the ambitions and plans of the Association are more widely known, 

the benevolent will assist them. 

The optimistic ambitions of the founder are gradually being realized. 
She has planned a wonderfully beautiful, complete and harmonious Home 
and has demonstrated that her ideas can be made a practical reality, for 
nowhere is there another retreat for the aged where there is less cause for 

dissatisfaction or discord. 

The ideal climate, with constant sunshine and blooming flowers, makes 

the place their mecca, adding to their years, which are made brighter and 

happier by being passed in nature's finest environment. 

A few years ago the beautiful McNabb Hospital was completed, Mr. 
McNabb presenting the gift to the Home at the dedication. 

It is one of the most modern Hospitals and Sanitariums on the southern 
coast, containing a scientifically perfect Operating Room, a modern Electro- 
Hydro-Therapy Room, and X-Ray and Laboratory Department. Also a 
specially equipped Obstetrical Room and Nursery. It has a fifty-bed ca- 
pacity, with beautifully furnished private rooms and four seven-bed wards, 
all bright and sunny, opening on the beautiful and well kept grounds of the 

Home. 

This Hospital is operated as a General Hospital, giving thereby a rev- 
enue to the Home, as well as care to the members when ill. 

WHAT SUPPORTS THE HOME. 

The first $20,000 received as entrance fees to the Home was made the 
nucleus of a sinking fund, which is invested in securities, paying 6 to 8%. 
To this fund has been added the bequests, and all money received specifically 
for the purpose of enlarging the endowment fund. 

The heirs of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Timken, make a generous monthly 
allowance to the Home towards its support. An income is also derived 
from the ten-acre lemon ranch, that is part of the Home property. 

The profits of the McNabb Hospital is an important item, besides giving 
the members the best possible care during their illness. The Fredericka 
farm supplies the Home and Hospital with vegetables, fruit, eggs, milk, 
poultry, squabs and rabbits. 

HOW TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

It is not necessary to live in San Diego to become a member of the Association. 
By subscribing to the sinking fund any amount, payable at once, or in monthly, 
quarterly or yearly installments. The amount so subscribed will be credited to 
your account when you are eligible to enter the Home. A member of the Associ- 
ation can name a beneficiary under his or her subscription, but only the one 
designated so will be credited with the amount so subscribed. Every dollar does 
a two-fold good; it helps to support the old of today and provides a Home for 
the subscriber if it is needed. Help to eliminate the need of charity by showing 
your friends how to care for old age that may come to all. Support the co-oper- 
ative idea and do your share in forming the ideal colony of old people and to 
sustain the work so well begun by Mrs. Saylor. 

Any information regarding the Fredericka Home for the Aged, asked of Mrs. 
Emma R. Saylor, Managing Director, 317 Timken Building, San Diego, California, 
will be cheerfully furnished. 



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Southern California 
Dancing Academy 

RICHARD O. KANDLER, Director 

Phone: Main "Twenty/* Office Hours: Nine to Five 

Office and Ballroom : Broadway at Eighth, Entrance on 

Eighth Street 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS in Modern Ballroom 

Dancing by Appointment. 

Class Instruction every Tuesday evening at eight 
o'clock until nine and every Saturday evening at 
seven until eight-thirty. Both classes are followed 
by delightful social or special parties. 

Notice: By request special afternoon and evening 
classes or dansantes may be arranged. 

Children Classes Wednesdavs at half-after three 
o'clock; on Saturdays at two o'clock. 
Among our patrons are members of the best fam- 
ilies of San 



Diego, Coronado and surrounding 



towns. 



Our Beautiful Ballroom for rent to select parties — 



weddings 



meetings 



conventions. 



Engagements filled to manage dances, furnish music, 
also arrange exhibitions or dansantes. 



* 



• 



Visit the 

Coronado Islands 

WEDNESDAYS, SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS 

EVERY WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY AND 

SUNDAY, Steamers leave Star Boat House 
wharf for Coronado Islands, Old Mexico, at 
9:00 A. M. 

CORONADO ISLANDS consist of a group of 
islands 15 miles due south of Point Loma, and 
about 8 miles off the Mexican coast. There 



Head' 
quarters 



for 

Marine 
Excur- 
sions 



are two large ones and several small ones. 
The only inhabitants are Pelicans, Sea Gulls 
and Seals. 

WONDERFUL MARINE GARDENS— From the glass 
bottom boat may be viewed the finest Marine Gar- 
dens on the Pacific coast. On the way out and back 
may be seen those strange creatures, the flying fish; 
also porpoises disporting themselves in the water. 

SHELL GATHERING. A two-hour stop is made at the 
islands for lunch and an opportunity to gather shells. 
Tackle is furnished free for fishing. 



* ^ $1.00 



Including Glass 
Bottom Boat 



$1.25 * 



Take Car 
No. 9 or 10 



Star Boat House 

FOOT OF MARKET STREET 



Take Car 
No. 9 or 10 






■ 



■ 





ESTABLISHED 1887 

BURNELL'S 

CURIOSITY STORE 

Oldest and Largest on the Coast 



MEXICAN, INDIAN 

AND CALIFORNIA CURIOS 

NATIVE GEM STONES 

JEWELRY 

1045 Sixth St., near C, San Diego, California 




BASILIO f. OSUYOS 

One of San Diego's Makers of Beauty 

Mr. Osuyos has as his profession the 
making of exquisitely hand-fashioned 
furniture, hand-carving and other craft 
work. He is a native of the Philip- 
pines, a graduate of the Throop Poly- 
technic Institue, a loyal San Diegan, 
and numbers among his patrons many 
of the city's most prominent people. 

PHONE MAIN 1810 

Craft Shop at 2567 Broadway 



PRINTS I %c. UP 



DEVELOPING FREE 



Broadway Camera Shop 

24-HOUR SERVICE GUARANTEED 
Conducted by J. H. LEONARD 

137 BROADWAY, Ground Floor Spreckels Bldg., SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



"^^fffc 





^TGl 




ASK 

YOUR 

GROCER 



IMPERIAL 



Telephones 
Home 2044 Sunset 1890 



Oldest Bakery in the City 
Established in 1886 



WINTER'S BAKERY 



F. X. WINTER. Proprietor 



Sole Manufacturers of Pan-Dandy Bread 

THIRTEENTH AND MARKET STREETS, SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



FRESH 

EACH 

DAY 




ASK 

YOUR 

GROCER 

FOR IT 
















4 
















V 





fhe Art Magazine Dc 



i 






The Library Table Dc 

CONTAINING OVER ONE h 

CAMERA CATCHES FLA 

FROM THE BIG OUT-OF-O 

SOUTHERN CAUFGRJ 






EMftA 



Showing the Transition of 

in a Picture Idnen 

from 

Squaw to Lady 

Gunny-sack to Era 

Buiro to Electric 

and 
Greasewood to Skysc 




PUBLISHED 



LILLIAN D. GREGO! 

"ME3ALAND" 
ORO GRANDE. CALiFOi 



The Kingdom of the Sun 
quarterly. Price, 50 eta. 

To all parties desiring an 
acription, a special price o 
postage extra will be made, 
subscriber to any additional 
the rate of $ 1 .00 for four m 
regular price to non-subsc 

50 cents per cop 






' 













THE EXPOSITION BEAUTI 

SAN DIEGO 




Botanical Building. 



Front Entrance Foreign Arts Building. 



Some of the 

Beautiful Spots 

in the 
Exposition 

Grounds. 










n Valley. San Diego County, fifteen miles 



The Mission 



• 















THE EXPOSITION BEAUTIFUL 

SAN DIEGO 
1916 





Botanical Building. 







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Some of the 
Beautiful Spots 

in the 
Exposition 

Grounds. 





. 



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The Mission Bells of the Arts and Crafts Building, San Diego Exposition 




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Patio Science and Arts Building 




THE EXPOSITION BEAUTIFUL 

SAN DIEGO ' 
1916 







A Glimpse of the Buildings Surrounding the Plaza, 



'n 



come to enjoy the beauties of San Diego's incomparable Exposition VISltors wh0 








From Entrance Foreign Arts Building. 



Magnificent Seven Counties Hall at San Diego Exposition 

One of the Don't-Miss Places of the Exposition Beautiful 





*TC ■■ 



■ ■ 




HARBOR ANL 




San Diego Ba 
two square n 
American Po 
Panama Cana 
natural harbo 
absolutely free 
of the year, 
had a metr 

109,195, and 
round natural 



Where Fruits and Flowers Bloom in the Beautiful El Cajon Valley, San Diego County, fifteen miles east of San Diego 



.# 



I 



M 




HARBOR AND CITY OF SAN DIEGO 








San Diego Bay has an area of twenty- 
two square miles; is the first Pacific 
American Port of Call north of the 
Panama Canal ; is one of the ten great 
natural harbors of the world and is 
absolutely free from storms at all seasons 
of the year. San Diego, in July, 1915, 
had a metropolitan population of 
109,195, and is the greatest all-year- 
round natural playground of America. 




Escondido Valley, thi 



)n Valley, San Diego County, fifteen miles east of San Diego 







HARBOR AND CITY OF SAN DIEGO 



San Diego Bay has an area of twenty- 
two square miles; is the first Pacific 
American Port of Call north of the 
Panama Canal ; is one of the ten great 
natural harbors of the world and is 
absolutely free from storms at all seasons 
of the year. San Diego, in July, 1915, 
had a metropolitan population of 
109,195, and is the greatest all-year- 
round natural playground of America. 

I 




Escondido Valley, the Sun-kissed Vale, thirty-four miles north of San Diego 






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HARBOR AND 



San Diego Ba 
two square 
American Po 
Panama Cana 
natural harbo 
absolutely free| 
of the year, 
had a metr 
I 09, 1 95, and 
round natural 






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■ AC NE HUNDRED 

MERA CA S FLASHED 

A THE BIG OUT-OF-DOORS OF 

SOU IN CALiF 






r rrion of the Desert 
in a Pictin 'literary 

from 



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Squaw f ^ly 
n *ck to Ermine 
Bu: ro Electric 



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mREGORY 

.LAND" 
«D£, O I iFORNIA 



3o; to e Sun Is issued 
quartet . Pncc^ 50 ct&> per copy 

? j ^siring annual sub- 

a , a spc pi of $ and 

e extra v >e made, entitling ti 

y ad tional numbers at 
00 ( magazines, the 

regular pr« io non- b3cribers being 

50 cents psr copy 



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IS A GIFT-BOOK 
The Song of California in Pictures 



An art-de-luxe magazine for an 
art-de-luxe gift, alive with brain- 



gems rrom famous writers, espec- 



ially adapted to the magazine's 



unique camera- catches of the 

big-out-of-doors of glad and 

sunny California 




Start your next year's Christmas purchases 
mailing in your order for the Christmas Number 

of the Kingdom of the Sun 

Following its established reputation, the 
Annual Christmas number of the Kingdom of 
the Sun for 1916 will be the best yet and will 
be ready for delivery November 30, 1916. 

The price of the magazine is 50 cents to non- 
subscribers, with the exception of the Xmas 
number, which is sold for 25 cents, postage ex- 
tra. A special price of $5.00 for 30 Xmas 
copies will be made to all parties ordering by 
November 1, 1916. 



(EljnsimaB (gift Imperial 

Mrs. Gregory, Kingdom of the Sun 

Frye & Smith, San Diego, California 

Kindly send me Christmas Special for 

1916, 30 copies for $5.00. Will pay for same 

on delivery. 



N 



ame 



Add 




State 



Single Copies 25 Cents, Postage Extra